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Arts Orange County, Summer-Fall, 2006

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"Purchase of Existing Works" Competition Results

Fifty (50) eligible applications were received by the March 31, 2006 deadline from artists living in or having a studio in Orange County. Artists submitted images of already-existing original visual art for purchase by Orange County and for display in county-owned buildings. The selection committee, comprised of three Arts Commission board members, met on April 11 and May 4. Their recommendations were presented to the full Arts Commission on May 8, 2006 and to the Board of County Commissioners on June 13, 2006.

Six (6) works of art by the following five (5) artists were selected for purchase:

“Summer Serenade” by Cathy Kiffney of Chapel Hill (21” x 28” x 1”) – hand-built ceramic triptych

Cathy Kiffney’s Artist Statement: “This work is from a series of triptychs The Secret Garden, an ongoing narrative in clay, telling a story of the beauty and mystery of an idyllic natural world. The title Summer Serenade refers to a hopeful notion of harmony among species.”

“Before Eve” by Alice Levinson of Hillsborough (43” x 28”) - batik fabric, machine pieced, appliquéd, and embroidered

Alice Levinson’s Artist Statement: “This work embodies the timeless feminine archetype, generation energy, and creativity. A figure can be found embedded in her lush garden. There are subtle suggestions of movement and growth.”

”Sinter Method: Rivers and Clouds #2 and #3” by Mario Marzan of Chapel Hill (48” x 24” each) – acrylic & graphite on wood panel

Mario Marzan’s Artist Statement: “My work is a reflection of growing up in the central highlands of Puerto Rico. Memories flood my thoughts ad greatly impact my recent work. I create sequences of drawings that fabricate a world where memories are topographically stored and distorted to their limits of collapse. This manipulation enables me to create a visual fiction, calling into question experiences of displacement, and the dilemma of my cultural dualism, from uprooted islander, to citizen of the U.S. mainland.”

“Box Elder” by Jennifer Miller of Durham (Orange County) (22.25” x 13.5”) – watercolor

Jennifer Miller’s Artist Statement: “Along the Eno River, trees cling to the banks through floods and droughts with their roots exposed and intertwined, communities of survivor trees – sycamore, red maple, ironwood, ash, beech, and box elder. This box elder, still bare from winter, was painted with watercolor on the river near Hillsborough in 2004, one in a series of Eno River tree portraits.”

“Riptide” by Martha Petty of Chapel Hill (50.5” x 60”) – oil on paper mounted on canvas

Martha Petty’s Artist Statement: “This painting is one from a series of 30 in which I sought to develop a vocabulary of landscape elements that I could employ to address life’s uncertainties. I used bright, sometimes jarring, colors; winding paths; and water-like grounds created through the use of loose, flowing brushstrokes to heighten the paintings’ emotional ambiguity. In all of these paintings, my goal has been to encourage reflection, rather than to communicate any particular message.”

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Southern Human Services Center Public Art Project Update

In the fall of 2004 a public art selection committee was formed to develop a public art project in the Southern Human Services Center (2501 Homestead Road, Chapel Hill), at the request of the Board of County Commissioners. The committee was composed of art professionals, community members, representatives of the Orange County Arts Commission, and representatives from the following Orange County departments (Manager’s Office, Social Services, Health, Housing, and Community Development). This committee determined that the artwork should be family-friendly and of a calming/soothing nature. The artwork would be sited in a prominent location inside the building, near the reception area.

This committee met in December, 2004, and again in March and April, 2005. A statewide call for qualifications with a March 15, 2005 deadline was distributed to North Carolina artists by direct mail and posted electronically by email and via various listservs and websites. Artists living in Orange County, NC were encouraged to apply. Artists were asked to submit a letter of interest, relevant experience/current resume, up to fifteen (15) images of their work, annotated image list, and references. Thirty-nine (39) responses were received from North Carolina artists. The artist selection committee reviewed the submissions and selected three (3) finalists to interview. Three (3) weeks of public comment were received. The selection committee then recommended artist Sarah Craige (Efland, NC) to the full Orange County Arts Commission for approval. Sarah’s proposal was a carved, glazed ceramic mural integrated into the architectural setting.

Sarah Craige’s concept statement about the piece follows:

“Tree of Life” is a mural that celebrated life, designed for the Southern Human Services Center. The central image of a strong, vital tree is an international symbol for life and growth, family, knowledge, and hope. The tiles are all hand-made terra cotta clay. They are carved and painted with many layers of colors, blazed and fired repeatedly until the rich vibrant colors are achieved. The mural will fill the large architectural niche in the central reception area of the facility. The poetic landscape celebrates and honors all those who visit the Center, from all cultures and for every generation.”

On June 7, 2005, the Board of County Commissioners approved Sarah Craige for the Southern Human Services Center Public Art Project. Sarah has excellent credentials and several years of relevant public art experience and was suggested primarily for her artistic merit and her ability to work successfully in the public art arena.

Since that time, Sarah has been working on this project, which is near completion. The artwork will be installed in the Southern Human Services Center during the summer of 2006. The photos of this project, by Sheldon T. Becker, were taken in the artist’s studio.

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Spring 2006 Arts Grants Awarded

The following organizations and individuals were awarded Orange County Arts Grants to support arts programming during the Spring 2006 grant cycle:

  • A.L. Stanback Middle School
  • ArtsCenter
  • Arts Advocates, Inc.
  • Cameron Park Elementary School
  • Carrboro Elementary School PTA - Cultural Arts Program
  • Carrboro, Town of/Carrboro Arts Committee
  • Carrboro, Town of/Carrboro Music Festival
  • Chapel Hill Community Chorus
  • Chapel Hill Public Arts Commission
  • Deep Dish Theater
  • Friends of the Carrboro Branch Library
  • Grady A. Brown Elementary School Cultural Arts Enrichment Committee
  • Hidden Voices
  • Barbara Higgins
  • Hillsborough Elementary School
  • Glenwood Elementary School
  • Cornelia Kip Lee
  • NC Arts in Action
  • NC Writers' Network
  • Orange County Artists Guild
  • Orange County Historical Museum
  • PlayMakers Repertory Company
  • Adam Sobsey
  • Jill Snyder
  • Susan Wells

    For more information, contact the Orange County Arts Commission at 919/245-2335 or visit our website at www.artsorange.org.

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    Two Area Students are Orange County Finalists in 2006 Congressional High School Arts Competition

    William S. Byrd, a graduate of Orange High School, and James Malone, a rising-senior at Chapel Hill High School, were the finalists from Orange County in the Fourth District Congressional High School Arts Competition, sponsored annually by the U.S. House of Representatives, and implemented locally through Fourth District U.S. Congressman David Price’s office. These two finalists were chosen from Orange County to participate at the district level. The district-wide reception was held on Monday, May 22, 2006 at the Burwell School Historic Site in Hillsborough.

    William is the son of Lesley Stanford of Hillsborough. His art teacher at Orange High School was Elizabeth Dell-Jones. James is the son of Peter Malone of Carrboro. His art teacher at Chapel Hill High School is Pamela Pate.

    The Orange County Arts Commission, the Durham Arts Council and United Arts Council of Raleigh and Wake County worked together to make this fourth district competition a success.

    Each spring, Members of the U.S. House of Representatives, committed to the importance of our cultural heritage, join together to recognize the creative spirit of American high school students in a nationwide art competition. The Congressional High School Arts Competition is implemented by the Members in the Congressional Districts and features paintings, drawings, and prints. Each Member brings a winning entry back to Washington, D.C. to be displayed in the corridor of the U.S. Capital. Launched in 1982, this nationwide event has produced thousands of local competitions, yielding more than 500,000 high school winners.

    If you would like to participate in the next fourth congressional district competition, contact your high school visual art teacher and/or the Orange County Arts Commission by mid-March, 2007.

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    2006 Fall Grants Deadline Announced by Orange County Arts Commission: Free Grant Writing Workshop Offered October 3, 2006

    The Orange County Arts Commission announces a Tuesday, November 21, 2006 deadline for receipt of grant applications for the fall cycle. Arts grants are available to nonprofit organizations, schools and individual artists. Fall arts grant categories are:

  • Arts Program Grant - funds up to $1,500 available to non-profit organizations coordinating arts projects benefiting the citizens of Orange County.

  • Arts in Education Coalition Grant – funds up to $5,000 available to three or more schools or parent and teacher organizations in Orange County to coordinate arts programs

  • Arts in Education Grant - funds up to $1,000 available to public or private schools, or parent/teacher organizations in Orange County coordinating arts programs.

  • Artist Project Grant - funds up to $1,000 available to professional artists coordinating arts projects benefiting the citizens of Orange County.

    Information Session: The Orange County Arts Commission will hold a free grant writing workshop on Tuesday, October 3, 2006 from 7-8:30 pm at the Chapel Hill Public Library (100 Library Drive) downstairs in the large conference room. To register or for more information, email to arts@co.orange.nc.us or call 919/245-2335.

    Fall Grants Project Period: The fall cycle of grants funds arts activities taking place from January 1, 2007 - December 31, 2007. A spring cycle will also be available for all categories including the General Arts Support Grant.

    Supportable Projects: Applicants may request funds to support a variety of arts programs in the visual, performing, and literary arts.

    Deadline: Fall applications must be received by 5 pm on Tuesday, November 21, 2006 at the Orange County Arts Commission office located at 110 E. King Street in Hillsborough (this is not a “postmark” deadline).

    Applications: Applications will be available by early-September at the Arts Commission office, at all Orange County Public Libraries, and online in both PDF and MS Word Document formats for downloading (www.artsorange.org).

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    Artists' Salon Series

    The Artists' Salon, sponsored by the Orange County Arts Commission, will be held on the following Friday nights in 2006:

  • Friday, August 18th
  • Friday, November 17th

    Artists' Salons are held from 6:30-9 pm at the ArtsCenter in Carrboro. Light hors d'oeuvres will be served. Salons are free, for artists of all kinds - performing, visual, literary, whatever! Come to meet, network, and build a better arts environment for all Orange County Artists.

    August’s topic will be “Independent Film Making”. Guest panelists will be Charles Thompson, Jr. (Center for Documentary Studies at Duke University), Charleen Swansea (Actress, Documentary Film Curator), Iris Thompson Chapman (The Life and Times of Joe Thompson) and Jim McQuaid (Independent Film Maker). The topic for the November salon has not yet been determined.

    The purpose of the salon is to bring together artists of all disciplines in a casual setting to share ideas, concerns and information. It is the hope of the Orange County Arts Commission to not only bring the artistic community together but to facilitate closer ties between artists and the general community of Orange County. Better serving the needs of artists is one of the goals of the Orange County Arts Commission. Artists often work in isolation and the salon can serve as a place to get feedback from peers as well as to share all of the problems and pleasures of being an artist with kindred spirits.

    The Orange County Arts Commission thanks the ArtsCenter for allowing us to use their space for this series.

    If you plan to attend, please RSVP to the Orange County Arts Commission at 919/245-2335 or email us at arts@co.orange.nc.us.

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    Grants Available to Orange County Artists: Information Session Scheduled August 10, 2006

    Durham Arts Council is currently distributing grant applications for 2006-2007 Emerging Artists Grants. The Emerging Artists Grant Program is designed to enable individual artists who have mastered the basic techniques of their art form to complete projects that will establish their professional presence. Grants may not exceed $1,500. Criteria for making the awards include the accomplishment and commitment of the artist, the feasibility of the proposed project and the impact the project will have on the applicant’s career.

    The application deadline is 9 pm on Monday, September 11, 2006. All entries must be delivered to the Durham Arts Council by that date – not postmarked. This program is open to artists living in Durham, Chatham, Orange, Granville and Person Counties. To be eligible for an Emerging Artists Grant, an artist must have lived in one of the five partner counties at least since September, 2004, must be at least 18 years of age and cannot be a student enrolled in an undergraduate or graduate degree program in their artform. Applications are available at the front desk of the Durham Arts Council Building, located at 120 Morris Street in downtown Durham or by calling (919) 560-2719. Applications may also be downloaded from the Durham Arts Council web site, www.durhamarts.org.

    There are three information sessions scheduled for this grant program. The Orange County information session will take place at 6 pm on Thursday, August 10th at the Chapel Hill Public Library (downstairs conference room).

    The Emerging Artists Program is cited repeatedly by local artists as providing important financial support and significant public recognition of their professional achievements. Durham Arts Council coordinates this program in partnership with the arts agencies of adjacent Chatham, Orange, Granville and Person Counties. This joint effort provides an efficient, non-duplicative administration and allows area artists to participate in the Emerging Artists Program. The cooperative nature of the program has also helped build relations between arts organizations in these counties and has encouraged networking between artists in the region.

    Durham Arts Council’s Emerging Artists Grant Program is funded by grants from the North Carolina Arts Council, an agency funded by the state of North Carolina and the National Endowment for the Arts, The Mary Duke Biddle Foundation, the Orange County Arts Commission, the Granville Arts Council, the Person County Arts Council, Chatham Arts, gifts to the Durham Arts Council Annual Arts Fund, the Ella Fountain Pratt Fund, The Wainwright Fund for New Works and private and corporate donations.

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    North Carolina Public Art Projects Receive National Recognition

    Four North Carolina public art projects were among 40 projects of note selected during Americans for the Arts 2006 Year in Review.

    Nationally-acclaimed artist Mary Miss and the head of the Milwaukee Institute of Art and Design, Robert Rindler made the selection from more than 189 entries from all 50 states.

    The four North Carolina winners were an earth mound and underground bell by David Tillinghast (Hendersonville), work at the South Tryon Bus Facility by Marek Ranis, R.M. Fischer and Alice Adams (Charlotte), Wind Silos by Ned Kahn (Charlotte) and the Rolf Neill Monument by Larry Kirkland (Charlotte).

    "It would have been interesting had North Carolina scored one spot on the list, but to achieve ten percent of the entire list is a tribute to the state's commitment to provide art for its residents and visitors," said Mary B. Regan, Executive Director of the North Carolina Arts Council. "And this recognition comes at a time when several cities in the state are examining their own public art policies and practices."

    During the North Carolina Arts Council's most recent grant cycle, six cities across the state vied for funds toward public art master plans up to $5,000.

    The selected work of David Tillinghast, an earth mound and underground bell on the Perry Ruddick Nature Trail in Hendersonville, was sponsored by the Center for Craft Creativity & Design and partially funded by the North Carolina Arts Council.

    "We hope the visitors and residents in North Carolina will have an opportunity to see these outstanding works of art that enliven public spaces and give visual interest to the built environment," said Jeffrey York, the North Carolina Arts Council's Public Art & Community Design Director.

    "It's only right that the people of the state have access to thoughtful and inspiring works on a daily basis in public places," said Regan. "North Carolina has a history of making landmark steps in all art forms, and the Year in Review simply highlights those public art achievements."

    The 40 works selected by Americans for the Arts and the National Public Art Network (PAN) will be reproduced as a CD-ROM resource.

    Americans for the Arts' Public Art Network develops services for the array of individuals and organizations engaged in the expanding field of public art. Currently, more than 300 public art programs exist in the United States at the federal, state and local level. As part of its mission to improve communities through public art, PAN advocates participation in public art through projects such as the Year in Review.

    - Reprinted by permission of the North Carolina Arts Council (www.ncarts.org)

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    We Are the Orange County Arts Commission

    The Orange Arts newsletter is a publication of the Orange County Arts Commission, the countywide arts agency working to promote the artistic and cultural development of Orange County.

    The Orange County Board of Commissioners appoints the fifteen members of this advisory commission. The Arts Commission is housed within the Economic Development Department. The Arts Commission recommends strategies to promote the artistic and cultural growth of Orange County, advises the Board of Commissioners on matters involving the arts, and acts as the granting panel for two annual funding programs available to individual artists and non-profit groups sponsoring arts projects in Orange County. Funding comes from Orange County, the North Carolina Arts Council, and other sources.

    Services of the Arts Commission include administering these two grants cycles that support both Orange County arts organizations and individual artists, maintaining a web site including an online local arts directory, and sponsoring workshops and skills development for artists and organizations.

    If you are an artist, or a citizen interested in the arts, contact the Orange County Arts Commission office and inquire about Board positions and other Volunteer opportunities. We are always on the lookout for Orange County residents who can help us fulfill our mission to promote and support the arts in Orange County.

    The Orange County Arts Commission also welcomes newsletter submissions from artists and organizations. For more information about Orange County Arts Commission services, programs and publications, contact us at:

    Orange County Arts Commission
    P.O. Box 1177
    110 E. King Street
    Hillsborough, NC 27278
    Phone: 919/245-2335
    FAX: 919/644-3008
    Web: www.artsorange.org
    Email: arts@co.orange.nc.us

    Our local arts are exciting, vital, and they are happening right now – so get out and enjoy the arts in Orange County!

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    Call for Artists: Purchase of Existing Works

    The Orange County Arts Commission is seeking local artists interested in submitting images of already-existing original pieces of visual art for purchase by Orange County. These artworks will be displayed in county-owned sites.

    A committee of the board will select one or more pieces from artists who live in or have a studio in Orange County. The budget for this project is $5,000, funded through the NC Arts Council’s Grassroots Arts Program allocation to Orange County.

    Interested artists should download this Call for Artists below. You can also contact the Arts Commission at 919/245-2335 or arts@co.orange.nc.us to have the application form and guidelines mailed or emailed to you. The deadline for submissions is 5:00 pm on Friday, March 31, 2006.

    Call to Artists: Purchase of Existing Works Prospectus

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    Cultural Resources Launches N.C. In Tune

    N.C. In Tune is a year long, statewide celebration of North Carolina music. N.C. In Tune honors and promotes the vast and gloried tradition of music and its dynamic and influential future in our state.

    Why N.C. In Tune?

  • Music touches our lives from early childhood on.
  • Music inspires and moves us, and adds joy to every day of living.
  • The creative people engaged in the art and business of music – singers, recording engineers, conductors, band and choral directors, songwriters, composers, and musicians – are key to North Carolina’s vibrant creative economy.
  • The state boasts more than 1,200 music organizations, including 48 performing organizations dedicated to orchestral music.
  • Music education helps build the creative thinking vital to a high-skilled workforce. There are 2,845 K-12 music teachers in the state.

    North Carolina music includes gospel sounds, Piedmont blues, contemporary works, classical music, bluegrass, opera, and a thriving Indie rock scene.

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    N.C. In Tune - Frequently Asked Questions

    Q. What is NC In Tune?
    A. NC In Tune is a year long, statewide celebration to honor and promote the vast and gloried tradition of music and its dynamic and influential future in North Carolina.

    Q. Who is behind the celebration?
    A. The North Carolina Department of Cultural Resources, which includes the North Carolina Symphony, the State Library, the North Carolina Arts Council, the North Carolina Museum of History, the North Carolina Museum of Art, the State Archives, and Historic Sites.

    Q. Why NC In Tune?
    A. Music touches our lives, from early childhood through our adult years. It unites us as a people, inspires and moves us, and adds joy to every day of living.

    Q. What is special about North Carolina music?
    A. Our state’s musical reputation really sings – from traditional to contemporary to classical to musical theater. Our greatest music includes jazz, bluegrass, Moravian, gospel, classical and blues.

    Q. Who is especially important to North Carolina’s musical life?
    A. Many of our state’s musicians, including James Taylor, Shirley Caesar, Thelonious Monk, John Coltrane, Doc Watson, Roberta Flack, and Charlie Daniels, have gone from being North Carolina residents to citizens of the world.

    Q. What is there to do?
    A. Hundreds of events: N.C. Symphony concerts, Music in the Park at the N.C. Museum of Art, special events at seven state History Museums, and three seasons of music at every state Historic Site headline a wealth of music festivals, concerts, and programs.

    Q. What about music especially for kids?
    A. North Carolina boasts one of the strongest arts in education programs in the country, with over 3,000 K-12 music teachers in our schools. And many organizations funded by the Department of Cultural Resources feature music for kids (of all ages).

    Q. What are some places to find out about North Carolina music?
    A. Of course, the North Carolina Symphony (www.ncsymphony.org), is a great place to find out about North Carolina music, as is the North Carolina Arts Council (www.ncarts.org), the Museum of Art (www.ncartmuseum.org), and North Carolina Museum of History (www.ncmuseumofhistory.org). There is often music at the 27 State Historic Sites. The State Archive collection include songbooks, photos, and recordings. One of the earliest is the sheet music “Songs in the Masque of Alfred” dated 1755. There is a photo of the 3 rd regiment Virginia Calvary which blew the “charge” at the battle of Bethel, Va., June 10, 1861. A 1937 photo of “Fiddlin’ Bill Hensley” in Asheville is just one of many of bluegrass and country musicians, many performing at WBT, WPTF or WRAL radio. Images of high school bands and choirs as well as stars of yesterday and today—from Cab Calloway to Shirley Caesar are in the collections.

    Q. If I am driving in North Carolina, what else can I look for?
    A. There are nine state highway markers with music as the subject. Five honor musicians: William Gaston, Lamar Stringfield, Charlie Poole, John Coltrane, and Bascom Lamar Lunsford. Three markers honor types of music: Bull City Blues, Lumina (acknowledging big band music), and Balladry. One marker honors the subject of a song made famous in the folk music craze of the 1960s – Thomas Dula, or “Tom Dooley.”

    Q. What on-line resources are available?
    A. Cultural travelers can go online to www.blueridgemusic.org to discover more than 200 sites all along the Blue Ridge Parkway in North Carolina and Virginia where mountain music and dance can be found. A companion guidebook, “Blue Ridge Music: Finding a Place in the Circle,” is available at most bookstores.

    Q. How big is North Carolina’s music industry?
    A. There are more than 1200 music organizations, including 48 dedicated to music and orchestral performances, are in the state. There are 10 outdoor dramas, one major film studio and more than 70 recording studios. Then, there are also the creative people engaged in the art and business of music – singers, recording engineers, conductors, band and choral directors, songwriters, composers, and musicians, who enrich our cultural life and add to what makes our state an attractive place to live, work and raise a family

    Q. How does North Carolina recognize its greatest songwriters and performers?
    A. One way is with the North Carolina Folk Heritage Awards. Since 1990, when the first awards were made, 44 musicians have received this prestigious award. See www.ncarts.org for a full list and biographical information. The North Carolina Awards, our state’s highest civilian honor, has been received by 7 musical or dance artists, including Andy Griffith, Doc Watson, Chuck Davis, James Taylor, Billy Taylor, Etta Baker, and Arthur Smith.

    Q: What is North Carolina’s State Song? Who wrote it and when?
    A: The Old North State. Written by William Gaston and composed by Mrs. E. E. Randolph, it was adopted as the State Song in 1927.

    Q: Does North Carolina have official state dance music?
    A: The state dances are the Shag and Clogging, both of which have unique music that accompanies them. They were adopted by the General Assembly in 2005.

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    N.C. In Tune - Sing, Play, for Life! A Resolution

    WHEREAS, music touches our lives from early childhood through our adult years in many forms and places – nursery rhymes, operas, work songs, ballads, CDs, and radio; at schools, churches, symphony halls, fiddlers’ conventions, and festivals; and

    WHEREAS, more than 1,200 music organizations exist in North Carolina, including 48 performing organizations dedicated to orchestral music; and

    WHEREAS, the creative people engaged in the art and business of music – singers, recording engineers, conductors, band and choral directors, songwriters, composers, and musicians – enrich our cultural life and add to what makes our state an attractive place to live, work and raise a family; and

    WHEREAS, our blues, gospel and Blue Ridge music traditions are known around the world, and contribute to a creative economy fueled by the growth of cultural tourism in North Carolina; and

    WHEREAS, many North Carolina musicians, including James Taylor, Roberta Flack, John Coltrane, Doc Watson, Billy Taylor, Shirley Caesar, Thelonious Monk, Randy Travis, Nina Simone, Earl Scruggs, and Kate Smith, have gone from being citizens of our state to citizens of the world; and

    WHEREAS, the North Carolina Arts Council has supported music in all its forms for more than 40 years, including classical, traditional, jazz, blues and bluegrass; and

    WHEREAS, the arts have been designated a part of the core curriculum in American education, and music is found in every school in the State -- in classrooms, band rooms, choirs, jazz bands, pep bands and orchestras, taught by nearly 3,000 music teachers K-12; and

    WHEREAS, the North Carolina Symphony, the first state funded symphony orchestra in the United States, will celebrate its 75th birthday in 2006-2007; and, as a full-time professional orchestra under the direction of Music Director Grant Llewellyn, performs about 170 concerts a year both in the Triangle and around the State; and

    WHEREAS, the North Carolina School of the Arts has been educating musicians at the secondary and university level for 40 years; and

    WHEREAS, the North Carolina Department of Cultural Resources nurtures the cultural life of our State, and oversees libraries with thousands of CDs and volumes about music; historic sites where many programs include authentic music; the office of archives and history, which oversees state highway markers, many of which honor musicians and musical themes; the museums of Art and History, where music is often a feature of their exhibitions; the state archive, where the history of music and musicians is housed; the North Carolina Symphony, which travels the State to bring classical works to our citizens; and the North Carolina Arts Council, which funds orchestras, opera companies, music ensembles and festivals, creates Web based music trails, produces a Touring Artist Directory, organizes an ArtsMarket for booking musicians and other artists, and awards fellowships to songwriters and composers;

    NOW, BE IT RESOLVED that 2006 be known as “N.C. In Tune” to honor and promote the vast and gloried tradition of music in North Carolina, and its dynamic and influential future as an art form and a way of life.

    LISBETH C. EVANS
    Secretary, North Carolina Department of Cultural Resources

    IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this tenth day of November in the year of our Lord two thousand and five, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and thirtieth.

    The following organizations have endorsed this resolution:
    North Carolina Arts Council Board of Directors
    North Carolina Symphony Board of Directors
    North Carolina Museum of History Associates

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    Fall, 2005 Arts Grants Awarded

    The following organizations and individuals have been awarded Orange County Arts Grants to support arts programming during the Fall, 2005 grant cycle. Representatives will accept their grant awards from the Orange County Board of County Commissioners on February 21, 2006 at the Southern Human Services Center in Chapel Hill.

    A.L. Stanback Middle School
    Art for Indigenous Survival
    ArtsCenter
    Nancy Simpson Carter
    Chapel Hill Community Chorus
    Chapel Hill Museum
    Choreo Collective
    Emerson Waldorf High School
    Ephesus Road Elementary School
    Footnotes Tap Ensemble
    Friends of the Carrboro Branch Library
    Grady A. Brown Elementary School
    Cultural Arts Enrichment Committee
    Jim Haberman
    Hidden Voices
    Hillsborough Elementary School PTA
    Isabella Women's Solo Vocal Ensemble
    Long Leaf Opera
    NC Youth Tap Ensemble
    Orange County Recreation & Parks
    PlayMakers Repertory Company
    Laura Janelle Royster
    Reuven Sadeh
    Southern Review, Inc.
    Transactors Improv Co.
    TriangleSings!
    Women's Voices Chorus

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    Congressional High School Arts Competition

    Each spring, Members of the U.S. House of Representatives, committed to the importance of our cultural heritage, join together to recognize the creative spirit of American high school students in a nationwide visual art competition. The Congressional High School Arts Competition is implemented by the Members in the Congressional Districts and features paintings, drawings, and prints. Each Member brings a winning entry back to Washington, D.C. to be displayed in the corridor of the U.S. Capital. Launched in 1982, this nationwide event has produced thousands of local competitions, yielding more than 500,000 high school winners.

    This competition is coordinated locally through Fourth District U.S. Representative David Price’s office. High school visual art students in the counties of Orange, Durham and Wake are eligible to apply.

    If you are a current high school visual art student in Orange County and would like to participate in the 2006 Congressional High School Arts Competition, contact your high school art teacher or the Orange County Arts Commission beginning in late February, 2006 for an application form and guidelines. The deadline to apply will be in late April, 2006.

    Please visit our web site to download the application and guidelines at www.artsorange.org or call 919/245-2335 for more information.

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    HomegrownHandmade: Art Roads and Farm Trails of North Carolina

    HomegrownHandmade is an exciting project based on an alliance of arts + agriculture, which have harmonized for a long time in North Carolina. There's always music at harvest festivals, food at craft fairs, and everything in between. The result is a unique series of fascinating agri-Cultural trails. Using journalism’s classic “5 W’s” model, here is the story of the HomegrownHandmade project.

    Who
    The Golden LEAF (Long-term Economic Advancement Foundation) was created in 1999 by Court Order and receives one half of the funds coming to North Carolina resulting from the tobacco Master Settlement Agreement. Golden LEAF continues to make grants to non-profit and government agencies. Golden LEAF objectives are to promote the social welfare of North Carolina's citizens and to receive and distribute funds for economic impact assistance. However, the most important member of the Agri-Cultural Alliance is you! With your help, communities all over North Carolina will learn what it means to share their Agri-Cultural heritage with others. The North Carolina Arts Council is a division of the Department of Cultural Resources. Arts Council goals are to develop, preserve and sustain North Carolina’s arts resources, to deepen the connection between the arts and North Carolina’s communities, and to heighten understanding of the role and value of the arts to the state. HandMade in America began when a handful of western North Carolinians pursuing economic development in their mountains realized that part of the answer could be found in the industry of craftspeople already working in shops, classrooms, studios, and galleries throughout the Blue Ridge Mountains. North Carolina Cooperative Extension is a partnership that began when county, state and federal governments agreed that by joining together they could provide all citizens with access to the wealth of knowledge generated by public universities. North Carolina Cooperative Extension is an educational partnership helping people put research-based knowledge to work for economic prosperity, environmental stewardship and an improved quality of life.

    What
    The North Carolina Arts Council, along with partners HandMade in America and N.C. Cooperative Extension Service, was awarded a grant from the Golden LEAF Foundation for a project aimed at stimulating statewide sustainable tourism and showcasing the state’s rural riches. The project will produce a system to develop Agri-Cultural Tourism that can be implemented throughout the state, from inventory development through business planning, market research, and development of marketing and promotion. Consumer-friendly Agri-Cultural Trails and Itineraries, such as those along I-40 and Hwy. 70, or around the Albemarle Sound, will follow the style and complement two books from HandMade in America, Farms, Gardens, and Countryside Trails of Western North Carolina, and Craft Heritage Trails. The latter has increased business for artists and galleries more than 23 percent. The N.C. Arts Council provides links to the state’s 2,300 arts organizations, draws on the resources of the Department of Cultural Resources, and oversees Trails criteria and marketing. HandMade In America, with its experience in developing, publishing, and marketing rural sites in the western part of the state, provides training in the development and expansion of rural tourism systems statewide. North Carolina Cooperative Extension works with farmers, families and communities to develop and enhance agritourism ventures in order to provide viable alternatives to traditional agricultural enterprises. Research-based information coupled with informal educational experiences of those involved in agricultural tourism is the focus of Cooperative Extension's efforts in the project.

    When
    The “Agri-Cultural Tourism: The New Cash Crop” project inventories hundreds of arts and agricultural sites packaged into consumer-friendly trails.

    Where
    Self-directed driving trails are being created statewide. For example, trails along Highway 158 or off I-40 might include art galleries, horse farms, or u-pick farming operations.

    Why
    Rural populations are declining, demand from local markets has eroded and tobacco-dependent communities face an uncertain future. Yet national consumer studies show that there is an interest in travel to small towns, with 86 percent visiting for leisure (over a three-year period).

    Increasingly, the growth segment of the tourism industry is the cultural and heritage tourist who seeks arts-related experiences. In North Carolina, where arts and agriculture have partnered at Harvest Days, Music Festivals and Farm Fairs, the reward of tourism has yet to impact many of our vibrant rural communities, but the promise is there. The agribusiness operator is limited only by his or her creativity. Agri-Cultural Tourism is seen as a means of income, employment generation, and diversification of local economies.

    For more information:

  • Golden LEAF Foundation (http://goldenleaf.org)
  • North Carolina Arts Council (www.ncarts.org)
  • HandMade in America (www.handmadeinamerica.org)
  • North Carolina Cooperative Extension (www.ces.ncsu.edu)
  • To participate, contact HomegrownHandmade (www.homegrownhandmade.com)
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    Orange County Artist Sarah Craige Chosen for Southern Human Services Center Public Art Project

    On June 7, 2005 the Board of County Commissioners selected artist Sarah Craige, from Efland, NC for the Southern Human Services Center Public Art Project. Sarah Craige has excellent credentials and several years of relevant public art experience and was chosen primarily for her artistic merit and her ability to work successfully in the public art arena.

    Sarah Craige’s proposed “Tree of Life” tile mural will be hand-made from terra cotta clay. The tiles will be carved and painted with many layers of colors, glazed and fired repeatedly until rich vibrant colors are achieved. The mural will fill the large architectural niche in the central reception area of the facility in Chapel Hill. Sarah’s poetic landscape will celebrate and honor all those who visit the Southern Human Services Center, from all cultures and for every generation.

    Sponsored by the Orange County Arts Commission, this $10,000 public art commission is funded from both public (county) and private sources. Sarah Craige’s tile mural will increase the value of the facility, as public art always does. Her mural will attract visitors and encourage economic vitality by providing business opportunities for local artists, fabricators, and suppliers.

    If additional grant support is received from the NC Arts Council, Sarah will serve as a mentor to a local apprentice on this public art project. The local apprentice has not yet been selected.

    At the request of the Board of County Commissioners for a public art project at the Southern Human Services Center, a public art selection committee was created in the fall of 2004. This committee was composed of representatives from the county departments of Social Services, Health, Housing and Community Development, the County Manager’s office, the Orange County Arts Commission, community members and arts professionals. Public art helps advance the missions of county departments by helping to create an environment conducive to meeting a variety of human needs. Based on the usage of the building, this committee decided that the artwork should be family-friendly and of a calming/soothing nature. They also decided that the artwork would be sited in a prominent location inside the building near the reception area. This committee met in December, 2004, and again in March and April, 2005. A statewide call for qualifications with a mid-March deadline was distributed to North Carolina artists by direct mail and posted electronically by email and via various listservs and websites. Artists living in Orange County, NC were encouraged to apply. Artists were asked to submit a letter of interest, relevant experience/current resume, up to 15 images of their work, annotated image list, and references. Thirty-nine responses were received from North Carolina artists. Three finalists were selected to present site-specific proposals to the selection committee, for which they were each compensated $300 plus round-trip mileage to Chapel Hill. Three weeks of public comment on these proposals was received - from April 28th-May 19th at three sites (Orange County Public Library in Hillsborough, Chapel Hill Public Library, and Southern Human Services Center). The artist selection committee recommended Sarah Craige’s proposal to the Board of County Commissioners. Her tile mural will be fabricated and installed during FY06.

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    Orange County Arts Commission Selected for North Carolina Museum of Art pARTnership Program

    The North Carolina Museum of Art has selected the Orange County Arts Commission for its pARTnership program this fall. This series, initiated several years ago, was organized specifically for arts councils and commissions across the state as a means to implement art projects relating to the Museum's collection or exhibition.

    Carrboro textile artist Marguerite Jay (“Peg”) Gignoux will involve families in the creation of a work of art during an artist-in-residence program at the NC Museum of Art in Raleigh. Peg will also involve senior citizens at the Central Orange Senior Center in Hillsborough in the further creation of this fabric artwork. The Orange County Department on Aging will serve as the Arts Commission’s programming partner for this public art project. The Arts Commission plans to locate the finished artwork inside a highly visible recreational facility, serving the central Orange County community.

    Participants from both sites will be invited to the opening reception when this intergenerational work of art is installed, so they can meet each other and view their combined creation.

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    CULTURAL TOURISM – A Growing Section of the Travel Market

    HERITAGE TOURISM DEFINED:
    According to the Travel Industry Association of America (TIA), Heritage Tourism is “travel that is motivated by a desire to experience the authentic natural, historic and cultural resources of a community or region.” This particular area has not only evolved into the fastest growing segment of the travel market, but it also has become a major component of the economic development efforts for rural and metropolitan areas alike. On average, visitors who enjoy cultural and heritage attractions and events stay longer and spend more than typical travelers. According to TIA, over 80 percent of U.S. adults who took one or more trips of at least 50 miles from home in the past year included at least one heritage related activity or event in their travels.

    North Carolina’s natural scenic beauty, rich history and unique cultural attractions have always been the core of the state’s tourism industry. It is because of the growing popularity of heritage tourism that so many of the state’s destinations and attractions have embraced this trend and support industry efforts to capitalize on North Carolina’s natural, historic and cultural resources.

    A GROWING SEGMENT OF THE TRAVEL MARKET:
    Data supplied by TIA indicate that heritage or cultural tourism is the fastest growing segment of the tourism industry, boasting a growth rate of 13 percent between 1996 and 2003. According to a study conducted by TIA and Smithsonian magazine in 2003, 81 percent of U.S. adults who traveled in the past year – 118 million people – consider themselves “historic/cultural travelers.” The study reports that most of these travelers agree that trips where they can learn something new are more memorable to them, and over half of them have hobbies and interests that have an influence on where they choose to travel.

    Two significant travel trends will dominate the tourism market in the next decade:
    1. Mass marketing is giving way to one-to-one marketing with travel being tailored to the interests of the individual consumer.
    2. A growing number of visitors are becoming special interest travelers who rank the arts, heritage and/or other cultural activities among the top five reasons for traveling.

    The combination of these two trends is being fueled by technology through the proliferation of online services and tools, making it easier for the traveler to choose destinations and customize itineraries based on their interests. Catering to the needs of these types of travelers will make the tourism industry more profitable in North Carolina.

    HERITAGE TOURISM TRAVELER PROFILE:

    The power of heritage tourism as a mechanism for economic development in North Carolina can be attributed to the characteristics of cultural travelers. Cultural travelers stay longer and spend more:

  • Compared to the average trip in the United States, historic/cultural trips are more likely to be seven nights or longer and include air travel, a rental car and a hotel stay.
  • In addition to planning longer vacations, historic/cultural travelers are also more likely to extend their stay to experience history and culture at their destinations.
  • In fact, four in ten added extra time to their trip specifically because of a historic/cultural activity.
  • North Carolina cultural travelers spend more money - $623 vs. $289 – during the course of an average trip. Travelers in the U.S. spend an average of $457 in general.
  • Of 11 common trip activities, 66 percent of historic/cultural persontrips include a visit to a historic place or museum, and 45 percent include a cultural event or festival. A total of 11 percent of historic/cultural trips taken in 2002 included both of these activities.
  • 21.4 percent of visitors to North Carolina take part in some sort of cultural activity, including visits to museums, rural sightseeing, attending cultural festivals and events and enjoying the performing arts.
  • Households taking historic/cultural trips tend to be headed by Baby Boomers (41 percent), age 35-54, with an average age of 49.
  • The median annual household income of those taking historic/cultural trips is $55,600.
  • The average household party size for travelers to North Carolina is 2.3 persons.

    Top Ten States Visited by Historic/Cultural Travelers:
    1. California
    2. Texas
    3. New York
    4. Florida
    5. Pennsylvania
    6. Virginia
    7. Illinois
    8. Tennessee
    9. North Carolina
    10. Georgia

    -reprinted from Update NC with permission from the NC Division of Tourism, Film and Sport Development

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    Sign Up and Be Counted!

    A recent study by Americans for the Arts, "Creative Industries: Business and Employment in the Arts," showed the arts to be a formidable industry, with 4.3 percent of U.S. businesses involved in the production or distribution of the arts. The study is based on data obtained from the well?known business information firm Dun & Bradstreet (D & B). It is the first national study that encompasses both the nonprofit and for?profit arts industry.

    Analysis, however, suggests that the nonprofit sector is underrepresented in the D & B database. So Americans for the Arts asks your help to make sure that your own organization is listed and properly coded, AND that all nonprofit arts organizations and artists have a D & B number. It's free and it's easy. Just go to www.americansforthearts.org/services/research/ri_article.asp?id=1525 and follow the instructions.

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    Arts Advocates, Inc. is New OCAC Arts Incubator

    Five years ago Orange County Arts Commission embarked on an innovative program to support the arts in Orange County. The Arts Incubation Program strives to create successful and self-sustaining local arts organizations by offering up to three years of concentrated skills and technical development and financial aid.

    The new participant in our Arts Incubation Program is Arts Advocates, Inc., a newly incorporated nonprofit promoting Orange County arts and artists to the public by displaying, interpreting, demonstrating, and marketing the work of Orange County artists. Arts Advocates, Inc. will establish The East End Gallery, a nonprofit gallery located in 300 sq. ft. of space fronting Main Street in Carrboro at The ArtsCenter. Arts Advocates, Inc. will operate this gallery featuring the work of Orange County artists and promoting the educational opportunities of The ArtsCenter. The target date to open is late fall of 2004. For more information contact Arts Advocates, Inc., 300-H East Main Street, Carrboro, NC 27510 (ATTN: Mary Harley Kruter). Please contact Mary Harley Kruter (919/969-9513; mhkruter@bellsouth.net).

    The first participant in the Arts Incubation Program was the Orange County Artists Guild, now established as a nonprofit organization. The Artists Guild coordinates the annual Orange County Open Studio Tour, sponsors a Spring Art Show and participates in the Arts at the Meadow (at Meadowmont). For more information on the Orange County Artists Guild, visit their web site at www.orangecountyartistsguild.com or contact Gordon Jameson (Artist Liaison) at 919/932-3438 or jame5916@bellsouth.net.

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    Just the Ticket

    A new study from the John Walker College of Business at Appalachian State University (ASU) reveals that North Carolina's nonprofit arts industry is just the ticket for powerful economic impact - $723 million annually and nearly 7,000 full-time jobs.

    Leading non-profit arts groups in the state average 13 full time jobs per organization. That number can double with part time and seasonal workers. Full time salaries alone generate an estimated $32 million in federal and state taxes.

    The study looks exclusively at the non-profit arts world. Additional data from the for-profit sector will add billions of dollars to complete the picture of the full economic impact of the creative industry in North Carolina. For instance, more than 6,100 craft artists in the state generate $538 million in revenue.

    The most comprehensive economic impact study of the nonprofit arts industry ever conducted in North Carolina, the Appalachian State University study estimated activity of 2,468 nonprofit arts organizations in North Carolina. The authors of the study are Dinesh K. Dave and Michael R. Evans.

    The following are highlights of what research discovered about the non-profit arts segment of the creative industry in North Carolina

    ESTIMATING ECONOMIC IMPACTS
    The ASU study is based on a controlled sample using surveys, plus data from 2,468 cultural organizations in the N.C. Arts Council database, including theaters, museums, galleries, historic sites, local arts councils, festivals, dance companies, literary groups, public art projects, and folklife organizations.

    The study places the direct economic impact of non-profit arts organizations in the state at $394,675,913. When using the very conservative multiplier factor of 1.5, and adding an estimate of the worth of volunteers' time of $131,034,421, the total economic impact estimate of the non-profit arts industry comes to $723,048,290. Additional data from the for-profit sector, artists, education, the film industry, the informal arts, and festivals will add billions of dollars to complete the picture of the economic impact of the creative industry in North Carolina. For instance, more than 6,100 craft artists in the state generate $538 million in revenue.

    JOBS, JOBS, JOBS!
    Just under 2 percent of all jobs in North Carolina are in the creative industry, from designers to journalists, gallery owners to administrators, and teachers to touring artists. Average employment in the non-profit arts sector - an important part of North Carolina's creative industry - would make any small business proud. It is estimated that there are 6,669 direct full time jobs in the non-profit arena. Leading non-profit arts groups employ an average of 13 full time people, and can double that number with part time and seasonal staff. The arts are vibrant and diverse, reflecting changing interests and tastes, yet arts organizations demonstrate stability in their communities: the median age of the non-profit arts organizations surveyed is 25 years.

    STATE/FEDERAL PAYROLL TAXES - $32 MILLION
    Cultural workers are taxpayers too. The non-profit arts industry sparks jobs and activities that produce more jobs, plus revenue and taxes. The average salary of full-time non-profit arts employees is $30,094. The minimum state and federal payroll tax withheld for this population is estimated at $32 million.

    ARTS LEAD ECONOMIC CHAIN REACTION
    Leading non-profit arts organizations in the state are comparable to small businesses. Their average annual income is around $1 million, up 15 % in the last five years. These non-profits start a powerful chain reaction of economic activity. This, in turn leads to vibrant and healthy communities.

    $24 MATCHES EACH $1 INVESTED
    Arts funding is dynamic. Each grant dollar invested by the N.C. Arts Council is matched by $24 other dollars locally.

    VOLUNTEERS ADD VALUE
    More than one million North Carolinians - nearly one of every eight citizens - are active arts supporters, members or volunteers. In total, 124,209 citizens in our state volunteered their time, talent, and energy as board members, ushers, docents, and in many other ways. 51,365 people volunteered in programs directly funded by the North Carolina Arts Council in Fiscal Year 02-03.

    Cultural volunteerism is up 13 percent over a four-year period. North Carolina cultural volunteers donate between one day and two weeks annually. Valued by the Independent Sector at $16.04 per hour, the financial support of this work is an impressive $131,034,421.

    CULTURAL ACTIVITY MORE IMPORTANT THAN EVER
    Audience participation trends are positive in North Carolina. Major non-profit arts organizations in the state saw more seats filled, with a four-year rise in average attendance (up 11%) to 29 million participants. North Carolina Arts Council funding is important seed money for many of these events and programs. Arts Council grant awards of $5,195,799 in FY02-03 benefited more than 9 1/2 million participants.

    A TOP 10 CULTURAL DESTINATION
    In July 2003, North Carolina was named as one of the Top 10 states for cultural and heritage tourism, according to the Travel Industry of America and Smithsonian magazine. North Carolina is especially attractive to families with children who are interested in educational and fun hands-on activities.

    CULTURAL TOURISM ON RISE
    Cultural tourism is the fastest growing segment of the tourism industry, up 13 percent between 1996 and 2002, according to the Travel Industry Association of America. Cultural travelers spend more money - $631 vs. $457, and stay longer - one to three more nights, than other travelers. They are hungry to have authentic experiences at the places they visit. On average, they schedule five cultural activities per trip. To download an executive summary of the ASU report, please visit http://www.ncarts.org/who_econsummary.cfm.

    Non-Profit Arts Impact

  • 1 million-plus volunteers
  • 6,669 Direct Full-time Jobs
  • Leading non-profit arts groups average of 13 Full-Time Jobs
  • $30,094 Average Salary
  • $32 Million in Payroll Taxes
  • Average Full-time and Part-time Payroll: $344,794

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    EXCERPTS Public Art Project

    (Photo by Seth Tice-Lewis)

    “Repetition and chance, pattern and improvisation; these are our constant companions. Available in every studio and urging an idea forward, reminding us who we are and where we’ve been. It is every artist’s privilege to harness the stripe, circle, corner and stroke into textures that provoke and reflect our lives. Textures dance, build, contort and confide. They talk to us in wood, metal, clay, paper, fabric and paint. They are hammered, stitched, combed, pounded, lacquered and pierced into meaning. Looked at together, we find community.”

    These are the words of Carrboro fiber artist, Marguerite Jay Gignoux, the curator for the Orange County Arts Commission’s EXCERPTS public art project. As a gift to the county during the Orange County 250th Anniversary Celebration, this original work of art will be installed in the stairway of the Orange County Government Services Center in Hillsborough. Seven Orange County artists were selected to participate in this collaborative project which will yield a large mixed media work created from many textures representing many disciplines.

    Participating artists are Joseph F. Gargasz of Hillsborough (sculpture), Gordon Clarke Jameson of Hillsborough (painting and handmade paper), Linda Mezzetti of Chapel Hill (textured painting), Linda Passman of Chapel Hill (mixed media painting), Beth Sale of Chapel Hill (painting and printmaking), Susan Simone of Chapel Hill (documentary photography), and Jan-Ru Wan of Chapel Hill (fiber installation). Chapel Hill artist Brian Plaster created several metal accents for the piece.

    The artists created a pair of textural studies representing their particular art discipline rendered from their points of view. To ensure visual harmony in the overall composition, both submissions relate to one another through obvious repetition of mark, pattern and/or shape. Artists worked in a neutral palette of whites, creams and grays in at least one of the studies. These textural studies vary in size and shape.

    According to Gignoux, “The EXCERPTS project is a celebration of community through the lens of a charming piece of North Carolina history. At the center of the project is an old document – a North Carolina almanac cover dating from 1795. Each participating artist responded to the old almanac and its curious text through their particular vocabulary of texture, symbol, and color. The collective created a wide range of paintings, digital images, collages and sculptural works that I released from their original frames and combined into a large stitched wall installation.”

    The following words are reflections on this project (including artist statements) from some of the participating artists:

    “The empty cast forms of scissors, a sickle, and other hand tools of trade evoke mental images of a past North Carolina history and in particular that of Orange County. These fossil-like forms pay homage to the textile, mining and farming communities around Hillsborough and the greater Orange community. The casts are reminiscent of fossils encrusted in oxidized materials, not to be forgotten…By re-orchestrating forms and negative spaces I attempt to develop a new dialog exploring recognition and glorification of man made objects or natural design. The viewer must be made aware that all spaces occupied and not are relative to an object’s soul or existence. Once these spaces are altered new perceptions about a form may be revealed.” - Joseph Gargasz

    “For me the most interesting aspect of working on this project is how the creative process was exemplified throughout. What began as a basic concept has developed into a sophisticated and cohesive work of art. I was one of the many voices contributing to EXCERPTS and in the end I think we sang well…In my own work there is a “conversation” that takes place as the piece evolves. It is an interplay between creator and creation that ultimately results in the finished work. The journey on the way to the finished work is the point -- then suddenly one arrives at the end. The end, the new work of art, is a great moment as well as another beginning.” - Gordon Jameson

    “I was very excited to be selected to participate in this project for the 250th anniversary of Orange County. Although I’m a native of Canada I’ve lived in Orange County since June 1990. I find this area stimulating and culturally rich. In preparing for this project I looked into the history of the county and was inspired by the human toil and hard work that went into the building of this strong community. Although the style is abstract, the shapes, lines and heavy texture I used in my paintings were inspired by Orange County’s rich historical and geographical features such as the Old Well on UNC campus, the court house spire in Hillsborough, and the Eno River, just to name a few. It has been great to collaborate with other North Carolina artists in celebrating this county’s anniversary… My painting is greatly influenced by my travels. In my paintings I draw on these past experiences, recalling how the skies differ from the cool crisp north to the still warm south. I spend a lot of time observing how light reflects off different things around us. In my paintings I try to create an image that evokes a feeling and a memory. I also want a painting to be so inviting that you want to touch it and feel the textures under your fingertips. I enjoy using everyday objects such as laundry lint, rope sand and fruit and onion sacks to build texture on the canvas. I feel that people can relate to these familiar everyday objects and are pleasantly surprised to see them transformed into intriguing paintings which merit some close examination rather than a quick glance.” - Linda Mezzetti

    "It was thrilling to be selected as one of the artists to work on the EXCERPTS project. I had never worked on this sort of collaboration and it seemed like the perfect metaphor for the theme of the work - a history of life in Orange County. Working with six other artists really sparked my creativity. As artists, we each discussed our own individual medium, style and the unifying theme. The concept of cooperation of the county's residents and their accomplishments inspired us all. Since I usually work with figures I wanted to express my vision of the county's past by showing the energy of the people who helped build Orange County. I drew images over the embroidered replica of the 1795 Almanac that all the painters involved in the project shared as a background. Letters from the old text emerged and then merged with hands, people and tools. My three sections are a small part of the fabric that is EXCERPTS and the celebration of the 250th anniversary of Orange County." - Linda Passman

    “I make quilt-like patterns with creatures waiting in them. The creatures are waiting to be discovered. They’ve always existed, but somehow, we are not consciously aware of them. I am excited about my quilt-like pattern pieces becoming part of a larger quilt. Just as an individual in a community, they are now involved with something greater… I seek to describe a world of precious perfection. Utopia can be a reality, whether it is existing in a parallel universe, or for a future generation. My artwork references my personal version of Utopia by using bright colors, bold figures, and freely drawn lines. These techniques are employed in order to create a playful childlike innocent atmosphere where hardships and worries have no home.” - Beth Sale

    “Handcraft and early mechanization bleed together in these images. The background is formed by rotation and melding of an archival image of the first cotton mill in the county laid over a page from an 18th century almanac shared by all of the artists. The drifting tools are also retrospective, historical, looking back to slowly crafted construction and days when we had to have time to do things by hand… Film is very literal. I like to take photographs of people and places simply, directly, with a 35 mm. camera. I want to show feelings, struggles, and emotions. I am also open to metaphor. Scanning images into the computer and combining them frees me to create an inter-play of ideas through visual images. I am a documentary photographer who craves the impact of poetry.” - Susan Simone

    “For this particular work, inspired by the collaboration idea with various wonderful artists and medium, I printed various images of hands -- tools in making or building which imply how we build up this rich community. Then I weave and overlay them into a final section; such as my role as an artist continually building, and stitching my thoughts, passion, and love into my work…Most of the works I have done deal with mixed materials, repetition, body and form. The profusion of materials questions the physical and psychological relationships between the mechanical and organic, the gigantic and the miniature. The multiplicity of small images, details, and objects that make up the whole reveal the individual and the universal simultaneously. That repetition of form and notion, the discrepancy between materials is wedded alchemically to produce a new harmony.” - Jan-Ru Wan

    An opening reception will be held at the site from 5:30-7:00 pm on Tuesday, September 9, 2003 (Orange County’s anniversary date).

    Individuals and businesses can sponsor a piece of this large mixed media work as a gift to Orange County for the county’s 250th anniversary. A plaque listing the sponsors and artists will be installed with the artwork. If you are interested in contributing financially to this public art project, please contact the Orange County Arts Commission by August 19, 2003. (The EXCERPTS contributions flyer in PDF format can be downloaded at www.artsorange.org/newsletter.htm#excerpts.)

    For more information, please visit our web site (www.artsorange.org), call the Orange County Arts Commission office at 919/245-2335, or e-mail us at arts@co.orange.nc.us.


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    Orange County 250

    250th Anniversary Brochure           Get Adobe Acrobat Reader

    Celebrating 250 Years of Diversity, Freedom, Preservation and Education

    On September 9, 1752 a new county was born in the North Carolina back country -- a county that spanned the area from present-day Greensboro to present-day Durham, from the Virginia line to the Uwharrie mountains. On that day, Orange County became a reality as its first colonial court of Common Pleas and Quarter Sessions was held at Grayfields along the Eno River.

    Originally inhabited by the Occaneechi/Saponi nation and other native American tribes, the new county encompassed a land area of 3,500 square miles (versus 400 today) including all of present day Alamance, Caswell, Person, Durham and Chatham counties as well as parts of Wake, Lee, Randolph, Guildford and Rockingham counties.

    Mindful of our proud heritage, the mission of the ORANGE COUNTY 250 celebration is to bring together citizens to celebrate and educate ourselves about the people past and present who have called Orange County home.

    As citizens in one of the oldest Piedmont counties, Orange County’s 120,000 residents -- up from 4,000 when the county was formed -- have a lot to celebrate:

  • Our commitment to education, from the founding of the University of North Carolina, the nation's first state university when it opened in 1795; through early advocacy for universal public education; the development of six freedmen’s schools by 1868; a district tax enacted in the 1940s to boost local school funding in Chapel Hill and Carrboro; to today's changing UNC-Chapel Hill and local school systems rated among the best in the southeastern U.S.
  • Our will to preserve cultural resources such as our tapestry of distinctive buildings and neighborhoods, as well as our farmland and natural treasures like Occoneechee Mountain and the Eno River corridor.
  • Our growing diversity, beginning with Indian nations, recast by the arrival of people from Europe and Africa, and shaped recently by the addition of persons from Asia, Latin America and other parts of the globe.
  • Our ongoing love of independence, whether reflected in the actions of the Regulators or the patriots of the American Revolution, by women fighting for equality, African-Americans struggling to secure their civil rights, sharecroppers and mill workers striving for dignity, or free-speech advocates protecting free expression in the mid-20th century. In all of these struggles, important battles were fought and won in Orange County.
  • The anniversary of the county's founding provides an opportunity and need to celebrate its 250 rich years. Social and political issues may sometimes divide us, yet there is much that argues for recognizing our common ground. Knowing that a diversity of interests, cultures and ideas have been a mainstay of the past 250 years makes it easier for us to welcome the diversity that the future will surely bring.

    The ORANGE COUNTY 250 committee seeks your help in celebrating our common heritage. Currently there are plans to:

  • Hold a kickoff event commemorating the county’s origin beginning on September 8th with a several-mile walk from Moorefields to Hillsborough bearing artifacts from the 1750s, followed on September 9 by a re-enactment of the first county court in the 1840 courthouse, brief remarks from several county dignitaries, and a ringing of church and courthouse bells across the county.
  • Post highway signs and banners that advertise and celebrate our anniversary, featuring a juried logo commissioned for the occasion.
  • Encourage the county’s numerous and varied civic and service organizations to incorporate programs with an ORANGE COUNTY 250 theme during the semi-quincentennial year beginning September 9, 2002.
  • Develop driving tours and other activities related to the county's heritage and diversity, encouraging local residents and visitors to explore Orange County.
  • Close the year-long celebrations by hosting an event saluting the county’s past, present and future in September 2003.
  • Please help us set the stage for a year of unity and celebration by volunteering to work with ORANGE COUNTY 250, by making a contribution, by identifying existing events that might share the anniversary theme, or by participating in related events throughout the year. For more information on how you can help, please call 245-2325 or send e-mail to edcmail.co.orange.nc.us. Please provide event information by July 31, 2002.

    We'd like to thank Central Carolina Bank & Trust Company for helping to sponsor the Orange County 250th Anniversary Celebration.

    This yearlong 250th anniversary celebration, ending on September 9, 2003, will include these events:

  • World Arts Festival -- Sept. 6, 27, Oct. 19, 25-26, Nov. 22-23, Dec. 13-14, The ArtsCenter, Carrboro
  • Orange County Open Studio Tour – Nov. 2-3, 9-10, 2002, Orange County Artists Guild, countywide
  • Hillsborough Candlelight Tour – Dec. 8, 2002, Hillsborough/Orange County Chamber of Commerce, Hillsborough
  • Community Dinner Celebrating Cultural Diversity – Feb. 9, 2003, Cultural Arts Group, Chapel Hill
  • Cornwallis Encampment Re-enactment – Feb. 22, 2003, Alliance for Historic Hillsborough, Hillsborough
  • Occaneechi-Saponi Pow Wow – June 13-14, 2003, Occaneechi Band of the Saponi Nation, Hillsborough
  • For a more complete listing, visit the official web site at: www.orangecounty250.org.


    Key Events in Orange County History:

    1701 – English explorer John Lawson arrived in the area and recorded his meeting with the Occaneechi

    1752 – Orange County formed, largely from Granville County, partly from Bladen and Johnston; western boundary indefinite until Rowan County was formed about a year later

    1754 – County seat (permanently named Hillsborough in 1766) established on 400 acres where the Indian Trading Path crossed the Eno River

    1771 – Government troops defeated Regulator army at Battle of Alamance; six regulators hung in Hillsborough

    1795 – University of North Carolina becomes the first state-supported university to open its doors

    1865 – Last headquarters of the Confederacy established at Alexander Dickson homestead in Hillsborough

    For a more complete listing, visit the official web site at: www.orangecounty250.org

    +++++++++

    Opportunities

  • Do you subscribe to the North Carolina Public Art Network listserv? If not, you can join at http://lists.ncmail.net/mailman/listinfo/ncpublicartnetwork. This listserv will send information on public art opportunities directly to your email address. Check it out!
  • Do you subscribe to the national Public Art Network listserv? If not, you can join by emailing Greg Esser at Americans for the Arts at gesser@ARTUSA.ORG and ask to be added to the national Public Art Network listserv. This listserv will send information on public art opportunities directly to your email address. Check it out!
  • Artists! Check out WESTAF's Call for Entry (CaFÉ) website, which enables artists to apply online to multiple calls for entry through a central Web site, www.callforentry.org.
  • ArtsMarketing.org helps your organization address its daily marketing needs and longer-term marketing issues. Check it out!
  • Volunteers from SCORE, the Service Coops of Retired Executives, are available for free consultations with businesses in Orange and Chatham counties from 1:30 to 4:30 pm every Tuesday and Wednesday at the Chapel Hill-Carrboro Chamber of Commerce. Call 919/968-6894 or 919/967-7075 to schedule an appointment.
  • The Southern Arts Federation, a service organization for the arts in the nine southeastern states, has launched a free job listing web site - www.artsopportunities.org. We encourage all North Carolina arts organizations to list their vacancies on this site and all job seekers to search the site for openings.
  • Artists should check out the Southern Arts Federation's programs, grant opportunities and resources at www.SouthArts.org.
  • Studio Sublet Available - January and February 2007
    700 sq ft, $320 per month includes all utilities
    Wings Community Arts Center at Northgate Presbyterian Church
    near the interstection of Roxboro Rd & Club Blvd. Durham

    Spacious 700sq ft studio with plenty of natural light, track lighting, work tables and wall space. In addition to the 700sq ft work space there is a private utility kitchen and bathroom. Wonderful project space to share with a group of your creative friends.

    Contact:
    Sherri Wood
    daintytime@gmail.com
    919/599-7770

  • Artist live/work and studio space to be created at Golden Belt in Durham - Scientific Properties, a Durham based real-estate development firm, is transforming a group of historic warehouses on East Main Street (in Durham, NC) into a much needed creative complex for artists and creative businesses. There is about 150,000 square feet of space in 5 buildings that will be developed to accommodate creative endeavors of all types including live/work apartments, work-only studio space, performance venues, small or collective business incubation, open floor plan office space, restaurant, and retail space. Help them develop their plan by taking their online survey: Golden Belt Creative Community Survey.
  • 2nd Friday Art Walk - Friday, December 12th at various art galleries and venues in the Chapel Hill/Carrboro area. 6-9 pm. Free. For more information and a map of participating venues, visit www.2ndfridayartwalk.com.
  • For monthly tips and news for working artists, sign up for a free online newsletter from SellArtSmart at www.art-exchange.com or info@art-exchange.com.
  • Disaster Prep for Artists - While most disasters are impossible to avoid, there are steps artists should take to minimize disaster losses and improve the likelihood of business recovery. Many of the Katrina-affected craft artists that the Craft Emergency Relief Fund (CERF) has helped have mentioned how they are now better prepared because of the lessons they learned from the disaster. CERF has put together a Disaster Preparation for Artists checklist that is a good starting point for those wanting to be prepared. Disasters can strike at any time and in any place with little or no warning. The time to formulate and implement a disaster plan is now.
  • 501 Diner is seeking local artists to display their work at the diner. Please contact Paula Kemp (new owner) at 919/933-3505.
  • The Artist at Work - Discover your inner artist! Durham Technical Community College, in partnership with The ArtsCenter in Carrboro, is pleased to announce two new certificate programs in the fine arts: the Certificate in Drawing and the Certificate in Painting. Artists enrolled in the programs learn technical skills in their discipline and develop their own personal style of expression as they create their portfolios. Each certificate program culminates in the Critique and Portfolio courses, where students discuss and critique each other's portfolios as well as receive advice and criticism from professional artists. Courses may take place at The ArtsCenter or at other locations as noted in the schedule. Students must register through Durham Technical Community College. For more information, please go to www.durhamtech.edu/html/current/noncredit/finearts.htm.

    Program Course Schedules
    NEW! Basic Drawing and Design * $159
    Develop your observational abilities and rendering skills in this introduction to the principles of drawing and two-dimensional design. Use charcoal, pencils, ink, and other media, while learning the fundamentals of composition, perspective, line and space, and other basic drawing techniques. Begin to develop your own unique drawing style through quick sketches as well as tight, technical rendering. 18 hours.

    0634751 M 9/11*10/23 6*8:30 p.m. TAC
    0634752 T 10/24*12/5 6*8:30 p.m. TAC

    NEW! History of Western Art I: From the Ancients of Egypt, Greece and Rome to 14th-Century Gothic Magnificence * $60 This course is a general introduction to the history of western art, its ancestry, and its heritage. Directed toward the beginning student, this course assumes no previous experience in art or art history. Major surviving monuments of painting, sculpture and architecture from prehistory to c. 1300 AD are introduced while methods and media of their production are studied. Learn the fundamental skills of visual analysis as well as the vocabulary and concepts for discussing works of art. In addition to learning about creative thinking and artistic techniques, understanding human cultural diversity is a major goal of this class. Each session includes slide lectures and group discussions. Textbook required. 12 hours.

    0634756 W 9/13*10/18 6--8 p.m. CHHS

    NEW! History of Western Art, Part II: From the Italian Renaissance to the Rise of Modernism * $60 This course is a general introduction to the history of western art, its ancestry, and its heritage. Directed toward the beginning student, this course assumes no previous experience in art or art history. In addition to learning about creative thinking and artistic techniques, students are introduced to major monuments of painting, sculpture, and architecture from the early Renaissance to the present day, learning the fundamental skills of visual analysis as well as the vocabulary and concepts for discussing works of art. The relationship between art and the culture that produced it are examined. Understanding human cultural diversity is a major goal of this class. Each session includes slide lectures and group discussions. Textbook required. 12 hours.

    0634757 W 10/25*12/6 6--8 p.m. CHHS

    NEW! Intermediate Drawing * $164
    In this class, you continue to refine your drawing and design skills as you use a variety of materials to draw still lifes, figures, and botanical subjects. Gain a greater understanding of how to create believable two-dimensional representations and compositions. Further develop your observational skills as you study light and shadow, correct proportion, and learn how perspective and foreshortening effect the rendering of subjects. 18 hours.

    0634755 W 10/25*12/13 6--8:30 p.m. TAC

    NEW! Introduction to Oil and Acrylic Painting * $171 This class will prime you and your canvas with the basics of how to get started painting. Explore the fundamentals of oil and acrylic painting and enrich your techniques and use of media. Learn color-mixing, underpainting, glazing and washing, dry brushing, and use of the palette knife. Discuss issues of composition, line, contrast, texture, and color. Experimentation with paint is encouraged as well as the development of your own personal style. Attention to each individual artist as well as demonstrations of materials, techniques, and applications are an important part of this course. 21 hours.

    0634753 W 9/6*10/18 6--9 p.m. TAC
    0634754 W 10/25*12/13 6--9 p.m. TAC

    Durham Tech also offers courses outside the realm of the certificate program for those interested in just taking a class as a hobby or for fun. One is a painting class offered at Chapel Hill High School. The information is below:

    Art from the Heart: Painting Made Easy!* $55 Learn to paint and have fun! This course is for the painting beginner or the advanced painter wanting to refine basic skills. The course concentrates on painting techniques, fundamentals, and critical discussion of works of art. Upon completion of the course, the student has a portfolio of study paintings demonstrating skills learned as well as a final "show-worthy" painting. Students must purchase their own supplies (approximate cost $75) with instructor's directions. (Because this course is self-supporting, no tuition waivers or exemptions are allowed.) 30 hours.

    2634352 W 9/6*12/6 6:30*9 p.m. CHHS

    Carol Hewitt (W.M. Hewitt Pottery) will be teaching "Creating a Successful Art Business" class again in the spring of 2007. The schedule is as follows and the cost is $75:
    (0714761) W Jan. 31-Feb. 28 6:00-9:00pm CHHS
    (no class on 2/14)

    For more information on any of these course offerings, please contact:

    Dina Logan
    Director, Orange County Centers
    Durham Technical Community College
    919/969-3032 x 251
    logand@durhamtech.edu

  • The next Orange County Arts Commission's Artist's Salon will be held Friday, November 17, 2006 from 6:30-9 pm in the West End Theatre at the ArtsCenter in Carrboro. The topic will be "Selling Art to the Holiday Gift Market," including guest panelists Gordon Jameson (Orange County Artists Guild Studio Tour), Michael Maher (Founder, Wootini Gallery & Store) and Bronwyn Merritt (Artist & former gallery owner). Studio tours, pricing, and taking credit cards and Pay Pal will be discussed. Questions will be taken from the audience. The presentation starts at 7 pm. Join us, have some refreshments, get some questions answered and make some good contacts.
  • The next 2nd Friday Art Walk will take place from 6-9 pm on Friday, January 12, 2007 in various galleries and venues in the Carrboro/Chapel Hill area. Sponsored by The Chapel Hill News, the Chapel Hill-Carrboro Chamber of Commerce, and University Mall. Free. For more information and a map of participating venues, please visit www.2ndfridayartwalk.com.
  • Carrboro Studio Space for Lease - I have multiple options for rental space, gallery showing at 206 E Main St in the old gas station , Honda Specialist building. With three bays facing the street , the location is ideal for painters who work large. This space would be communal and provide opportunity for Friday artwalks and other open house dates. It is available for monthly rental, 6 months or a year. It will be anchored by Archer Graphics. I do not discourage other artists besides painters from inquiring, but it is not a very Clean or Private space.

    There is a more private space available in the rear building of this location with private bathroom and parking for $250 per month.

    These buildings will be torn down in 12 to 24 months to make way for phase one of the Main Street Partners 300 block plan for ArtsCenter and Cats Cradle, so it is a short term opportunity for big exposure. This is beginning NOW, in April.

    Please inquire by phone 919/929-7522 or email to Ronnie Parks at archergraphics@bellsouth.net.

  • Practicing artists with successful teaching experience are encouraged to submit a letter of interest and resume to the Alamance County Arts Council. Instructors are needed for various age levels, in a range of artistic disciplines (including visual, performing and literary arts). Competitive pay, supportive administration. Please email letter of interest and resume to maryruth@triad.rr.com or mail to Mary Ruth, Education Coordinator, Alamance County Arts Council, 213 S. Main St., Graham, NC 27253. Phone 336/226-4495.
  • Art and Ag Driving Tourism Trails Create New Cash Crop for Area Counties - Farms. Chefs. Attractions. Roadside produce stands. Writers. Festivals. Restaurants. Museums. Galleries. Art studios. Nightclubs. Musicians. Photographers. Historic sites. Poets. Grocery stores. Banks. City halls. Community colleges. Visitors centers. Artists.

    What do they all have in common? They may qualify to participate in a project created by the North Carolina Arts Council, www.homegrownhandmade.com, the first statewide effort to create thematic driving trails featuring art and agritourism. To see a sampling of what has already been developed in the eastern part of the state, click on the site and check out the trails.

    The project is free to all participants and is paid for by grants from the Golden L.E.A.F. Foundation, focusing upon counties that have traditionally had some form of agricultural based economy. The goal is to create a new "cash crop," blending tourism, arts and agriculture together.

    The trail in this area will include Chatham, Orange, Lee, Randolph, Guilford and Alamance counties.

    Are You One of These?
    - Restaurants/hotels/B&Bs serving locally produced food
    - Restaurants/hotels/B&Bs displaying locally produced art or featuring local performers
    - Restaurants serving recipes indigenous to the community (like: BBQ, catfish, Brunswick stew)
    - Galleries
    - Retail stores
    - Visual art studios/shops
    - U-pick-it farms
    - Roadside stands
    - Farmers' markets
    - Arts Councils
    - Visitors Centers
    - Festivals
    - Events
    - Cultural events
    - Corn mazes
    - Historic walking tours featuring buildings with architectural significance
    - Night clubs featuring local performers
    - Public gardens
    - Museums
    - Recreational Parks and Reserves
    - Farms open to the public

    Do You Meet Criteria?
    - Standard hours of operation (can include "by appointment only")
    - Safe, clean, tidy
    - Significant proportion of North Carolina merchandise
    - No shops that feature imports
    - Welcoming to people from outside the community
    - Related to cultural, heritage, agricultural, and natural resources
    - Compliant with Americans with Disabilities Act
    - Directional signage
    - Hotels/B&B's "connect" to arts and agriculture
    - Interpretation ? signage, brochure or knowledgeable staff
    - Focus on authenticity and quality

    Does Your Restaurant Meet Any 5 of These Criteria?
    - Shows local art on the walls/display cases and/or uses handcrafted items as tableware
    - Has interpretive materials that tell about the arts on premises and/or the history of the place
    - Regularly has live music
    - Features locally grown produce
    - Offers a selection of N.C. indigenous foods
    - Serves indigenous N.C. recipes, such as bean bread
    - Is in an architecturally significant building
    - Is popular with locals
    - Has a unique authentic regional claim to fame, such as "N.C.'s oldest restaurant"

    Greta Lint, local project coordinator for the North Carolina Arts Council, says, "This is the most in-depth, cutting edge tourism effort ever created in our state. Each trail runs through 3 or 5 counties, offering the traveler opportunity to hear local music, eat locally grown food, pick locally grown produce, see locally made crafts and spend more money. By digging deeper into what communities offer, it allows businesses and artisans opportunity to capitalize upon the tourism dollar. In 2003, tourism generated nearly $18 million in direct and indirect spending in North Carolina."

    For more information, call Greta Lint at 336/626-0527 or visit www.homegrownhandmade.com. You may also call Rebecca Moore, Director of Marketing, NC Arts Council at 919/733-2119 or visit www.ncarts.org.

  • The Orange County recycling division is now crushing its green glass bottles instead of sending them off to Raleigh for recycling. Right now it's a relatively small size particle with some blue in it, quite attractive and might have some application in art tiles or mosaic or other similar applications. There is a pile of about 100 tons at the landfill. It's about half pea sized gravel and about half 'sand'. If someone wanted to view the pile and see if they can use the material at either its current particle size or a larger size, they can contact the landfill manager, Paul Spire at pspire@co.orange.nc.us or via phone at 919/624-0221. The material will be for sale at less than $25 per ton, price is not firm yet. They will load larger quantities for anyone who wants it. For more information, please contact Blair Pollock, Solid Waste Planner, 919/968-2788.
  • Unfurnished 2-room apartment with private bath, in Hillsborough artist's house. $500/mo plus $300 deposit. Includes kitchen privileges, studio space, all utilities, DSL, phone. No pets, no smoking. View rooms at www.unc.edu/~jbrady/Studio/House/index.html. Call Michael at 919/923-4455.
  • PROVENCE RESTAURANT in Carrboro looking for artists to exhibit paintings with mediterranean influence (landscape, villages, coast line,etc). Please contact in the afternoons: Felix Roux, Provence, 203 W. Weaver st., Carrboro, NC. 919/968-5008.

  • Panzanella is requesting artists to display their works in this Carrboro restaurant. Please use the contact information on the following "Call for Artists" (pdf). (Please note that there is also an application form/artist agreement to be signed.)

    Get Adobe Acrobat Reader

    If you do not have the free Adobe Acrobat Reader installed on your computer, download it first (click on the icon above or click on www.adobe.com/products/acrobat/readstep2.html). Then come back to this page and download the following pdf file.

    Panzanella - Call for Artists

  • Be sure to check out the Triangle Community Foundation's website often for grant/scholarship opportunities: www.trianglecf.org.
  • If you are a craft artist and need emergency assistance, check out the Craft Emergency Relief Fund at www.craftemergency.org/emerassistance.html.
  • Studio Space: I am considering renting a co-op house on Weaver St in Carrboro where there are several rooms and a joint entry space, exhibition space, kitchen, copy area. The space would lend itself to someone who needs a cleaner space vs. a dirty space. Rent would vary from $200 to $500 per month depending on size of space. Contact Ronnie Parks, archer13@bellsouth.net or call 919/929-7522.
  • Call for Artists - Town of Cary Art Exhibitions. The Town of Cary announces solo and group art exhibition opportunities at Page-Walker Arts & History Center, Jordan Hall Arts Center and more. Artists are invited to submit an application at anytime for future exhibitions. Applications submitted by March 15 will be included in the next review. Applications submitted after this date and by September 15 will be held for the fall review. To request an application, contact the Public Art Coordinator at 919/465-4791. or pick up an application at Page-Walker Arts & History Center, Jordan Hall Arts Center, or any Cary community center. There is no fee to apply. Applications can be downloaded from the Town of Cary website, www.townofcary.org/depts/prdept/events/gallery.htm.
  • Explore CLC is looking for a ceramics instructor for their center in Raleigh. They have a wheel and a kiln but most of the work would be handwork with younger students. Classes run on Saturdays and one on Monday morning for home school. All classes depend upon enrollment. Compensation will be by the hear, 30% of revenue will go to the teacher. Interested? Please call Jillian Goldberg at 919/862-8866 x 222.
  • WHEN WORKS PASS INTO THE PUBLIC DOMAIN - Lolly Gasaway, University of North Carolina, has created a chart that clearly lays out when works pass into the public domain. The chart may be freely duplicated or linked to for nonprofit use. www.unc.edu/~unclng/public-d.htm".
  • The University of North Carolina School of Law created the Community Development Law (CDL) Clinic to help meet the legal needs of nonprofit and community development organizations. In the CDL Clinic, third year law students, under the supervision of law school faculty, furnish free corporate and transactional counsel to nonprofit organizations whose missions are to build and strengthen under-resourced communities.

    The CDL Clinic is a two-semester program in which third-year students provide corporate and transactional counsel to North Carolina nonprofit community development organizations. CDL students work on a wide variety of business law projects including: forming corporations and limited liability companies; spinning off subsidiaries for existing nonprofit corporations; advising organizations regarding local, state and federal taxation; negotiating and drafting contracts on behalf of nonprofit organizations; assisting organizations with real estate acquisitions; helping structure joint ventures between nonprofit and for-profit entities; obtaining necessary state licenses for nonprofit programs. Students in the CDL Clinic take primary responsibility for interviewing clients, structuring the legal projects, negotiating on behalf of their clients, and drafting all necessary legal documents. The goal of the CDL Clinic is to help students develop skills in corporate and transactional law, show them how those skills can be put to use in serving under-resourced communities, and at the same time provide valuable legal services to community organizations serving those communities.

    If your organization could use legal counsel in some aspect of its program, or if you would like more information about the clinic, please contact Mark Dorosin (CDL Clinic Supervisor) at 919/843-9909 or dorosin@email.unc.edu or visit UNC Community Development Law Clinic.

  • The next Artists’ Salon will take place in the West End Theatre at the ArtsCenter in Carrboro from 6:30-9:00 pm on Friday, February 16th, 2007. Sponsored by the Orange County Arts Commission, these Artists’ Salons are free, and for artists of all kinds – performing, visual, literary, whatever!

    The topic of the February salon will be "Customer Satisfaction". Guest panelists will include Carol Hewitt (W.M. Hewitt Pottery) and Rob Fox (General Manager, PlayMakers Repertory Company). Light hors d’oeuvres will be served.

    The purpose of the salon is to bring together artists of all disciplines in a casual setting to share ideas, concerns and information. It is the hope of the Orange County Arts Commission to not only bring the artistic community together but to facilitate closer ties between artists and the general community of Orange County. Better serving the needs of artists is one of the goals of the Orange County Arts Commission. Artists often work in isolation and the salon can serve as a place to get feedback from peers as well as to share all of the problem and pleasures of being an artist with kindred spirits.

    The OCAC thanks the ArtsCenter for allowing us to use their space for this salon series. Please RSVP to the Orange County Arts Commission (919/245-2335 or arts@co.orange.nc.us) to let us know if you plan to attend.

  • Copyright Information for Artists - Check out www.nea.gov/artforms/Manage/Copyright2.html.
  • Health Insurance for Artists - check out The Artists' Health Insurance Resource Center on the Americans for the Arts web site.
  • Web Site Development for Artists - Check out the New York Foundation for the Arts web site at www/nyfa.org/level2.asp?id=38&fid=1.
  • Artists' Studios for rent at the Clay Centre (402 Lloyd Street, Carrboro). 140 sq. ft each. Two people can share a studio for $400/month (total), with utilities included in that price. For more information, call Barbara Higgins at 919/967-0314 or email her at bjjhiggins@msn.com.
  • Art Gallery offering retail and studio spaces for rent. No commission, 6 month agreements, available January 2003. Opening special: month of January rent - half price. Call 919/742-3878 (Siler City, NC).
  • The New York Foundation for the Arts (NYFA) has launched NYFA Source, "the nation's most extensive database of awards, services, and publications for artists of all disciplines." Artists, funders, arts organizations, and the general public can access NYFA Source for free at www.nyfa.org/nyfa_source.asp?id=47&fid=1.
  • Arts in the New Economy. The summer 2002 issue of the Journal of Arts Management, Law, and Society focused on issues surrounding art and culture in the new economy. A PDF version of this issue is now available at www.culturalpolicy.org/pdf/neweconomy.pdf.
  • “Deeper Than Skin or Gender: Community Arts and Cultural Diversity.” The author of this article looks at the similarities and differences between the place of the artist in different communities. www.communityarts.net/readingroom/archive/intro-diversity.php.

  • Board Café, at www.boardcafe.org/, is a newsletter exclusively for members of nonprofit boards of directors. Check it out!
  • Tips for Nonprofit Accountability. Charles B. Maclean, PhD and founder of PhilanthropyNow has developed a self-audit for nonprofits to help prevent behaviors that could have a negative impact on donors. In his article, Maclean offers tips for nonprofit accountability. www.pnnonline.org/article.php?sid=734.
  • STANDARDS AND PROCEDURES FOR ETHICAL BEHAVIOR. Independent Sector has announced a new accountability initiative to help boards and staff of nonprofits develop clear standards and procedures for ethical behavior. The organization has produced an online compendium of the standards of more than 60 nonprofits. www.independentsector.org/issues/accountability.html.
  • IMAGINING AMERICA. A national movement to link universities with the communities they serve through arts, design, and humanities projects. www.ia.umich.edu/.
  • The New York Foundation for the Arts (NYFA) announces a new free online database of grants, residencies, publications and sources of information and assistance for artists of all disciplines. NYFA Source identifies more than 2,600 award programs, 2,000 services and 700 publications for artists in dance, music, theatre, performance art, visual art, design, media art and literary arts. The database may be accessed through www.nyfa.org.
  • National Heritage Fellowships: Nomination Information. As part of its efforts to honor, assist, encourage, and present artists and artforms that reflect the many cultural traditions that make up our nation, the NEA annually awards up to 12 one-time-only National Heritage Fellowships for master folk and traditional artists. These fellowships are intended to recognize the recipients' artistic excellence and support their continuing contributions to our nation's traditional arts heritage. For information on how to nominate someone, go to their website at arts.endow.gov/guide/Heritage02.html.
  • The Creative Arts in Public/Private Schools (CAPS) Program of the Durham Arts Council provides creative ways for students and educators in public and private schools of Durham and Orange counties to access arts education. Students are taught history through dance, language through poetry, science through photography, and other core curriculums through the arts. If you would like information on how to become a CAPS Artist-in-Residence, check out the Durham Arts Council's Artist Services Update. To find out how to place a CAPS artist in your child's school, contact Jane Williams at 919/560-2718 or jwilliams@durhamarts.org.
  • Triangle Community Foundation is building a database of all eligible non-profits so that its donors can get involved in community organizations serving Wake, Durham, Orange and Chatham counties, and have access to the full range of granting opportunities in their fields of interest. If you're interested in submitting an agency profile, contact Jan Muller at 919/474-8360 or email to jan@trianglecf.org.
  • North Carolina Arts Council – The annual deadline for most organizational grant requests to the North Carolina Arts Council is March 1st.  For more information about their programs and grants, call 919/733-2111 or visit their website at www.ncarts.org.
  • Durham Arts Council offers revised Exhibit Directory for Durham, Orange and Wake Counties. There are approximately 140 exhibit opportunities listed in this guide with contact names, numbers, addresses and suggestions on how to approach galleries. Exhibit spaces are divided into Commercial, Nonprofit and Alternative spaces. Copies are available for $5.00. Send request and payment (made to Durham Arts Council) to Jennifer Collins, Durham Arts Council, 120 Morris Street, Durham, NC 27701.
  • North Carolina Handmade is a new on-line gallery featuring arts and crafts made in North Carolina. Unlike a typical gallery, North Carolina Handmade will focus on handmade copies of original works instead of more expensive one-of-a-kind pieces. North Carolina Handmade is looking for artists and craftspeople who might be interested in having North Carolina Handmade sell their work. They plan to market pottery, jewelry, fabric arts, glasswork, woodwork, toys and dolls, and any other item handmade in North Carolina. North Carolina Handmade's mission will be to focus on promotion, maintaining a web store, customer service, and shipping while freeing each artist to focus on creating. They have put together a sample web site, www.nchandmade.com, so that they can demonstrate what we have in mind. The site includes sample arts and crafts, sample artist profiles, customer service information pages, and information for artists about working with North Carolina Handmade. For more information, contact Cheri DeRosia or David Brown at info@nchandmade.com or 919/401-9912.
  • +++++++++

    Contribute

    The Orange County Arts Commission welcomes article submissions from individuals and organizations. Please contact us at arts@co.orange.nc.us or (919) 245.2325 for more information.

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